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PPP Loan Program: Analysis of Treasury Department Interim Final Rule on Affiliation; Impact on Portfolio Companies

April 6, 2020 Leave a comment

MLM Headshot Photo 2019 (M1341570xB1386)By: Matthew L. Mitchell

On April 3, 2020, the United States Treasury Department issued “Interim Final Rules” and a related guideline concerning the Paycheck Protection Program’s “Affiliation Rule.”   The Interim Final Rule and guideline may be found here:

The instructions included in the Interim Rule and Guideline significantly limit, by application of the Affiliation Rule, the types of businesses that are eligible to apply for loans under the Paycheck Protection Program.  Of particular note:  The Interim Rule and Guideline apply the restrictions of the Affiliation Rule to start-up and emerging businesses, likely precluding many such companies from access to PPP loans funds.

The Morse Employment Law team is following this topic closely. Read our latest COVID-19 Alert for more information.

DOL Releases New Guidance for Compliance with CARES Act and FFCRA

April 3, 2020 Leave a comment

AET Headshot Photo 2019 (M1344539xB1386)By: Amanda E. Thibodeau

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced new guidance to help states with administration of the new unemployment provisions part of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). It also updated and added additional guidance for the paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave implementation under the FFCRA.

The new unemployment guidance provides help to states in implementing the temporary emergency state staffing flexibility provision of the CARES Act. It also provides help to states in determining eligibility requirements for applicants – especially in the area of gig workers and independent contractors, who are not typically eligible for unemployment benefits. The new guidance can be found here.

The guidance added by the DOL for the paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave implementation includes a webinar to help employers determine eligibility and answer other questions related to benefits and protections under the FFCRA. The DOL also added additional materials to its Questions and Answers and added more workplace posters in additional languages. You may view these new materials here.

The Morse Employment Law team is following this, and other matters related to COVID-19 responses, and will continue to report as appropriate.

DOL Posts Temporary Rule Issuing Regulations on Families First Coronavirus Response Act

April 2, 2020 Leave a comment

AET Headshot Photo 2019 (M1344539xB1386)By: Amanda E. Thibodeau

On April 1, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) posted a temporary rule issuing regulations on the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA).  In particular, the new regulations deal with implementation of the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA) and Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (EFMLEA) portions of the FFCRA. The regulations are temporary and will expire December 31, 2020, and will not affect the Family Medical Leave Act beyond that date.

The new regulations shed light on several important areas of the FFCRA.
Our COVID-19 Alert addresses a few key takeaways on the following topics:

  • Self-quarantine
  • Effect on FMLA Leave and Paid Time Off Used Concurrently
  • Small Business Exemption
  • Intermittent Leave
  • Notice and Leave Documentation

The new regulations take effect immediately and contain many more details concerning the implementation of the FFCRA. Please see our previous Alert on the FFCRA for additional requirements under the new law, or reach out to our Morse Employment Law Team for help.

SBA Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”)

April 1, 2020 Leave a comment

JEH Headshot Photo (M1160809xB1386)By: Joseph E. Hunt

On March 31, 2020, the Department of the Treasury (“Treasury”) issued guidance for the Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”), one of the hallmarks of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (“CARES”) Act designed to provide up to $350 billion in short term loans to small businesses affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to information provided by Treasury, while PPP loans can only be made by private lenders who are certified by the Small Business Administration (“SBA”), they are fully guaranteed by the SBA. These PPP loans are made for a two-year period, and provide a 0.5% fixed interest rate with repayments deferred for six months.

An applicant business is eligible to obtain a PPP loan equal to the lesser of (a) $10 million or (b) 250% of its average total monthly payroll costs over a trailing 12-month period, as measured from the loan origination date. Loan amounts will be forgiven as tax free cancellation of indebtedness as long as (i) the loan proceeds are used to cover payroll costs, mortgage interest costs, rent expenses, and utility costs over an eight (8) week period beginning as of the origination date, and (ii) employee and compensation levels are maintained.

Per Treasury, the underwriting standards for eligibility are relaxed, and private lenders making PPP loans will be required to verify that the applicant business was in operation as of February 15, 2020, and that it had employees for whom it paid salaries and payroll taxes.

The application window opens on Friday, April 3, 2020 for small businesses and sole proprietorships and Friday, April 10, 2020 for independent contractors and self-employed individuals. Applications can be made through any SBA-certified private lender.

Additional resources are available on the Treasury’s website.

Morse is following this topic closely. Please feel free to reach out to your Morse contact, or to speak with Joe HuntAmanda Thibodeau, or Matt Mitchell directly, should you have any questions.

Read our latest COVID-19 Alert.

DOL Issues Revised Emergency Paid Sick Leave Guidance; Limits Scope Of Small Business Exemption

March 31, 2020 Leave a comment

MLM Headshot Photo 2019 (M1341570xB1386)By: Matthew L. Mitchell

As previously reported in an earlier Employment Law Alert, the emergency paid sick leave provisions of the Federal Families First Coronavirus Act (the “FFCA”) take effect April 1, 2020.

In anticipation of that effective date, the federal Department of Labor (the “DOL”) has published a revised and expanded “Questions and Answers” Guidance (the “Guidance”) concerning the FFCA.

This guidance addresses 59 distinct subject matters that relate to the complex application of the FFCA.  Of particular note:  The Guidance defines the scope of the FFCA exemption that applies to employers with fewer than 50 employees.

The text of FFCA implies a general exemption, from the paid sick leave requirements of the FFCA, for employers with fewer than 50 employees, that are experiencing economic hardships as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.  Through the Guidance, the DOL adopts a narrowed interpretation of this small business exemption:

“A small business is exempt from certain paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave requirements if providing an employee such leave would jeopardize the viability of the business as a going concern. This means a small business is exempt from mandated paid sick leave or expanded family and medical leave requirements only if the:

  • employer employs fewer than 50 employees;
  • leave is requested because the child’s school or place of care is closed, or child care provider is unavailable, due to COVID-19 related reasons; and
  • an authorized officer of the business has determined [certain financial exigencies exist.]”

Guidance, Q&A 59.

As such, unlike previous reports, small businesses are not broadly exempt from FFCA emergency paid leave requirements, and must provide employees with emergency paid leave benefits absent the limited exceptions described above. For example, under the Guidance, a small business is required to provide 80 hours of emergency paid sick leave to an employee that is absent from work as a result of a COVID-19 related illness.

In addition to the Guidance, in the coming days, the Internal Revenue Services is expected to publish instructions related to tax credits available to employers that incur expenses related to FFCA emergency leaves.

The rules and guidelines that relate to the FFCA, and to the other federal and state coronavirus relief programs, are moving targets.  The Morse Employment Law team is following these, and other matters related to COVID-19 responses, and will continue to report as appropriate.

Read our latest COVID-19 Alert.

DOL Releases New Fact Sheets and FAQs for Compliance with Families First Coronavirus Response Act

March 25, 2020 Leave a comment

AET Headshot Photo 2019 (M1344539xB1386)By: Amanda E. Thibodeau

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) released its first wave of new guidance as part of its initiative to help employers implement and comply with the new Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“the Act”).

The DOL posted a Fact Sheet for Employees, a Fact Sheet for Employers and a Questions and Answers document on a number of compliance aspects of the Act, including how an employer counts the number of their employees to determine coverage; how small businesses can obtain an exemption; how to count hours for part-time employees; and how to calculate the wages employees are entitled to under this law.

The DOL expects to release further guidance on these topics later this week. Additional DOL guidance on COVID-19-related topics, including new workplace posters can be found here.

The Morse Employment Law team is following this, and other matters related to COVID-19 responses, and will continue to report as appropriate.

IRS, DOL, and Treasury Issue Plan on Implementation of Payroll Tax Credit, Paid Leave and Other Employment-Related Provisions of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

March 24, 2020 Leave a comment

AET Headshot Photo 2019 (M1344539xB1386)The Internal Revenue Service (IRS), U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), and U.S. Treasury Department issued a joint statement highlighting the employment-related provisions of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“the Act”), which was signed into law by President Trump on March 18, 2020 (see our previous alert on this subject here).  The three departments offered a preview for small and mid-size businesses related to the implementation of these various provisions.  A summary of their highlights is below.

  • DOL plans to release regulations relating to the Act by April.  While employers are not required to comply with the Act until April 2, the DOL and IRS made clear that employers, unless exempted, may begin to provide paid leave under the Act and take advantage of the available tax credits immediately.  The anticipated regulations will provide further guidance on the sick and child care leave requirements of the Act.
  • DOL plans to release emergency guidance related to small business exemptions related to leave.  The Act provides an exemption for businesses with less than 50 employees from leave requirements related to school and daycare closings where the leave requirements would threaten the viability of the business.  The DOL plans to issue guidance with “simple and clear criteria” on the qualifications related to this exemption.
  • DOL will be issuing a temporary non-enforcement policy to allow employers to come into compliance.  Under the temporary policy, the DOL will not bring enforcement actions against employers for violations of the Act, but instead will work with employers to assist in compliance with the Act, provided the employer has acted reasonably and in good faith.
  • The IRS will be releasing guidance later this week about how employers can obtain the tax credits related to providing sick or child care leave.  In short, employers will obtain the credit by withholding the amount of money equal to the cost of leave provided from their payroll taxes, rather than depositing with the IRS.  If the amount withheld is not enough to cover the paid leave provided, employers will be able to file a request for payment on an accelerated basis, to be processed in two weeks or less.  The IRS will release further details on the procedure in their anticipated guidance.

The Morse Employment Law team is following this, and other matters related to COVID-19 responses, and will continue to report as appropriate.