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Posts Tagged ‘state law’

Coronavirus Response Update – March 13, 2020

March 13, 2020 Leave a comment

MLM Headshot Photo 2019 (M1341570xB1386)By: Matthew Mitchell

The Coronavirus outbreak is creating unprecedented challenges for employers. Existing employment law standards and structures do not contemplate our present circumstances, and employers are increasingly faced with novel questions with respect to employee relations.

We are beginning to see some clarity on the subject, however. As government and organizational actors begin to deploy response strategies, best employment practices regarding Coronavirus concerns are emerging.

Matthew Mitchell provides answers to several common questions regarding the Coronavirus in the following COVID-19 Client Alert.

The Morse Employment Law Team is following this topic closely. Please contact us should you have any questions.

Coronavirus Response Update – March 12, 2020

March 12, 2020 Leave a comment

In recent days, we have seen increased incidents of COVID-19 infections in Massachusetts and around the United States, and extraordinary actions from federal, state, and organizational actors in response to the outbreak – including the announcement by the White House last evening of a European travel ban, and the proposed suspension of all Social Security payroll taxes.

We are fielding many inquiries from concerned and confused private-sector clients concerning appropriate response strategies.

As outlined in our prior Alert on the subject, it should be emphasized that, at this time, there are no legal directives, related to Coronavirus, that apply generally to restrict the business operations of private-sector employers.  Rather, there are government-issued guidelines and recommendations that place the burden on employers to adopt their own common-sense measures, within existing legal rules.  For example:

That said, it has been reported that Federal and state governments are now considering emergency orders that would regulate and limit operations of private-sector employers, including directives that would require temporary closures of some workplaces.  As such, we believe it is prudent that employers begin now to plan for such contingencies.

The Morse Employment Law Team is following this topic closely.  Please contact us should you have any questions.

A New Year’s Reminder: Discretionary, End-Of-Year Bonuses and the Massachusetts Equal Pay Act

January 8, 2020 Leave a comment

MLM Headshot Photo 2019 (M1341570xB1386)By: Matthew Mitchell

The discretionary, end-of-year bonus is the most common form of incentive compensation. When executed well, the discretionary bonus provides employers with the opportunity to reward employee success. However, when executed poorly, even a well-intentioned discretionary bonus may result in significant employment law liability.

The recent passage of the Massachusetts Equal Pay Act, M.G.L. c. 149, §105A (the “Act”), complicates the compliance landscape that applies to discretionary bonuses.  As January bonus season kicks off, employers are well-served to understand the restrictions that the Act imposes on discretionary bonuses.

Review our Employment Team’s recent Employment Law Alert to learn how the Act regulates the type of compensation structures employers may apply to their Massachusetts employees.

For more information, please contact Matthew Mitchell or Amanda Thibodeau.

“Magic” Numbers for Federal and State Employment Law Coverage

June 8, 2016 Leave a comment

ela_indexBy: Sandra E. Kahn
There is an ever-increasing array of regulation on employment practices at the state and federal level. But when do growing businesses become covered under the employment laws of these jurisdictions?

It’s all in the employee numbers: Six, Fifteen, Twenty, Fifty, One Hundred. For example, when a business has six employees, the company becomes covered by the MA Fair Employment Practices Act but then at fifteen, it also comes under the federal laws of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. As the company grows, different regulations come and go and it is critical to be aware of it in order to maintain legal compliance.

Read the full post here.