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Federal District Court Reinstates EEO-1 Pay Data Reporting Requirements (For Now)

March 22, 2019 Leave a comment

MLM Headshot Photo 2019 (M1341570xB1386)By: Matthew Mitchell

In September 2016, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) announced plans to collect employee compensation data as a component to its annual EEO-1 employer information reporting requirement. This pay data reporting requirement – known as “Component 2” – was slated to go into effect in March 2018, and would have required all private employers with over 100 employees, and certain smaller, government contractors, to report W-2 wage information and total hours worked, for all employees, by race, ethnicity, and sex, within 12 proposed pay bands. Component 2 was an aspect of Obama-era reforms aimed at strengthening EEOC capacity to identify and prevent pay discrimination.

In August 2017, the White House Office of Management and Budget (“OMB”), under the Trump Administration, stayed the implementation of Component 2, indicating that Component 2 disclosure requirements were unreasonably burdensome for employers – the U. S. Chamber of Commerce estimated that Component 2 would result in $400 million in additional administrative costs to employers. That action by the OMB prompted a lawsuit by the National Women’s Law Center and the Labor Counsel for Latin American Advancement against the OMB and the EEOC.

On March 4, 2019, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia issued an opinion reinstating Component 2, concluding that the OMB did not have a sufficient basis to support its decision to stay Component 2. The Court’s decision may have significant implications for employers. The current EEO-1 Report filing deadline is on May 31, 2019, and it is unclear whether Component 2 pay data disclosures will be required for the May 31 reporting cycle.

It remains to be seen whether the ruling is appealed, whether the EEOC issues any special instructions in light of the ruling, or whether the EEOC takes steps to revise its EEO-1 reporting guidelines (although the EEOC does not presently have a quorum to effect such a change). Morse Barnes-Brown Pendleton’s Employment Law Group will continue to monitor this issue, and will provide updates as they become available.

For more information, please contact Matt Mitchell.

Scott Connolly Discusses Properly Classifying Workers in Accounting Today

August 3, 2017 Leave a comment

SJC Headshot Photo 2015 (M0846523xB1386)In Accounting Today’s article “Properly Classifying Workers Remains a Major Problem“, employment attorney Scott Connolly comments on how worker misclassification is a prevalent issues for both the Internal Revenue Service and state taxing officials. Companies that misclassify employees as independent contractors avoid paying minimum wage, payroll taxes, overtime, worker’s compensation, and other payments under the Federal Family and Medical Leave Act.  However, this mislabeling can lead to trouble with the IRS, including the company owing taxes it failed to withhold by classifying a worker as an independent contractor instead of as an employee.

Additionally, as Scott notes:

The employer should be concerned about misclassification claims from the workers themselves… Many service providers want to be classified as independent contractors, but companies run the risk because later there might be disharmony in the relationship.”

Read the full article for more information on the potential consequences of misclassifying workers, or contact Scott Connolly for more information.

Federal Judge Temporarily Blocks New Overtime Rule From Taking Effect On December 1

November 23, 2016 Leave a comment

2015-01-05_8-57-41By: Scott J. Connolly and Sandra E. Kahn

On November 22, a federal judge in Texas issued a preliminary order that temporarily blocks the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) from implementing changes to the salary basis for white collar overtime exemptions.  The new salary rule, which was to become effective on December 1, 2016 would have required employers to increase exempt employees’ minimum salary from $23,660 to $47,476.  The preliminary court order blocking the rule appears to apply to all public and private employers nationwide.SJC Headshot Photo 2015 (M0846523xB1386)

Find out how the judge’s order will affect the new salary rule, which was to become effective on December 1. Read this month’s Employment Law Alert.

Are You Ready to Reclassify? New Overtime Regulations Go Into Effect on December 1, 2016

October 5, 2016 Leave a comment

By: Sandra E. Kahn

2015-01-05_8-57-41On December 1, 2016, any employees who earn less than $47,476 annually will be entitled to overtime and must be treated as non-exempt, as per the U.S. Department of Labor’s final rule (“Final Rule”).
Don’t wait any longer to address this critical change in the law.
Find out how the Final Rule will affect your current employee classifications and pay practices, and the consequences of not complying with the law.

Read this month’s Employment Law Alert.

New Overtime Regulations Will Result In Many More Workers Becoming Entitled To Overtime

May 18, 2016 Leave a comment

By, Sandra E. Kahn

On May 18, 2016, President Obama announced the publication of the U.S. Department of 2015-01-05_8-57-41
Labor’s final rule (“Final Rule”) updating the overtime regulations, and providing that employees who earn less than $47,476 annually will be entitled to overtime.

The federal Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) “white collar” exemptions are familiar to most employers. Under the FLSA, employees must be paid the minimum amount required by the statute on a salary basis, and the employee’s job duties must primarily involve executive, administrative, or professional duties. The Final Rule changes only the salary basis test, leaving in place the existing duties test.

For more details, read our full alert and visit our Employment Law Group page.

New Federal Law Protects Trade Secrets But Also Requires Changes to Employee and Contractor Agreements

May 5, 2016 Leave a comment

By: Sandra E. Kahn

The new Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016 (DTSA) is expected to be signed into law by President Obama.  The Act will allow claims for trade secret theft to be brought under a federal civil cause of action.

Under certain circumstances, the Act will provide protection for whistleblowers who divulge trade secrets to the government in order to report wrongdoing.  As such, employers will now have to inform their employees of that protection in any agreement or contract.  It is advised that employers consult with their counsel to revise contracts as necessary.

For a more detailed explanation of the DTSA, read the full post on our Good Company blog.

Retaliation Once Again Is the Top Type of Claim Filed with the EEOC

February 24, 2014 Leave a comment

Employment Attorney Bob SheaBy: Robert Shea

The federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) has released its statistics for fiscal year 2013 and for the fourth straight year charges alleging unlawful retaliation by employers was the leading type of discrimination alleged. Retaliation claims accounted for 41.1% of the charges filed with the EEOC, up three percent from 2012. Retaliation was followed by race discrimination (35.3%), gender, including sexual harassment and pregnancy discrimination (29.5%), disability discrimination (27.2%), and age discrimination (22.8%). The EEOC’s enforcement and litigation statistics for FY 1997 through 2013 can be found here.

For more information on this topic please contact any member of our Employment Law Group.