Archive

Posts Tagged ‘gig economy’

Amanda Thibodeau Speaking on MCLE Program on Employment Law Issues for Gig Workers

July 10, 2019 Leave a comment

AET Headshot Photo 2019 (M1344539xB1386)Employment attorney Amanda Thibodeau will be speaking on the MCLE program Employment Law Issues for Gig Workers, being held on Tuesday, July 30. The program will provide an overview of the current state of the law, how various governing bodies on the state and federal levels have grappled with companies and workers in the gig economy, and how each side can protect themselves and navigate changing employment laws in this arena. The agenda will include topics of discussion such as:

  • What is the “Gig Economy” and which employers and workers fall into this category
  • Overview of classifications of workers and legal consequences of misclassification
  • Reviewing recent state and federal guidance on classification issues
  • Reviewing states’ legislative responses governing gig employment
  • Understanding other common employment issues in the gig economy
  • Understanding how a gig business can mitigate its risks and what workers should do to protect themselves

For more information and to register, view the MCLE event page.

DOL Issues Opinion Letter Classifying Workers in the Gig Economy As Independent Contractors

June 6, 2019 Leave a comment

2015-01-05_8-57-41The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) recently issued an Opinion Letter analyzing the classification of workers in the virtual marketplace or “gig economy.” This refers to companies that operate in the “on-demand” or “sharing” economy, using online and smartphone applications to connect consumers to service providers in a wide variety of services, such as transportation, cleaning, delivery, and shopping.

The DOL was asked to analyze the classification of such service providers under the Federal Labor Standards Act (FLSA), ultimately deciding that based upon the facts provided by the unidentified company in question, the service providers were independent contractors.

This is vitally important in that independent contractors are not afforded the same protections under the FLSA as employees. For example, employees are entitled to minimum wage, overtime pay, and other benefits under the FLSA, while independent contractors are not. Continue reading in our Employment Law Alert.