Paid Sick Leave Law Creates New Employer Obligations for Intermittent, Temporary and Seasonal Workers, Including Interns

July 7, 2015 Leave a comment

MBBP's Wage & Hour Tip of the MonthEmployers who use temporary or seasonal employees including summer interns should already be aware of the importance of ensuring that those employees are paid in compliance with federal and state law. Massachusetts employers should also be aware that the new Massachusetts Earned Sick Leave Law (the “Law”) has created additional wage and hour obligations for some temporary and seasonal workers, including summer interns. (Generally, the Law requires that employers with more than 11 employees offer both full and part-time employees paid sick time; employees with fewer than 11 employees are required to offer unpaid sick time).

The Massachusetts Attorney General’s regulations addressing the Law include a provision which entitles temporary and seasonal employees like interns who work intermittently for an employer (e.g., work for the same employer for multiple summers) to sick time. The result of these regulations is that employers covered by the Law now need to track the accrual of sick time for temporary and seasonal workers, and permit those employees to take sick time once they have worked for the employer for more than 90 days.

Under the regulations, an employee with a break in service of fewer than four months will maintain the right to use any unused earned sick time accrued before the break in service. If the employee has a break in service of between four and 12 months, the employee will maintain the right to use earned sick time accrued before the break in service, but only if the employee’s unused bank of earned sick time equals or exceeds 10 hours. Employees with a break in service of greater than 12 months will not retain any accrued sick time.

Although temporary or seasonal employees are subject to the Law’s provision that employees are only entitled to use accrued sick time 90 days after the employee’s first day of work, employees with a break in service of fewer than twelve months will maintain vesting days from the employer and will not need to restart the 90-day vesting period upon their return to the employer before they can use earned sick time.

For example, an intern who works full time for an employer from June until August will likely have accrued more than 10 hours of sick time. If that intern returns to the employer the following June, he or she will (upon working 90 total days for the employer, including days worked before the break in service) be entitled to use that accrued sick time.

For more information on the use of temporary or seasonal employees including interns or the accrual of paid sick time, please contact a member of the Employment Law Group.

Massachusetts Attorney General Issues Final Earned Sick Time Regulations

June 26, 2015 Leave a comment

The final version of tela_indexhe Massachusetts Attorney General’s Earned Sick Time Regulations contains some important clarifications to the Earned Sick Time Law, including changes from the draft regulations.  These changes include a fifth reason that leave may be taken, guidance regarding unlimited and lump sum policies, and a variety of other provisions.

Employers should review their policies to take advantage of the options provided in the new regulations.  To see what changes have been made and how they might affect you please read the full alert.

Employment Law Alert: Paid Sick Leave Transition Period

May 19, 2015 Leave a comment

The earned sick time law was approved by the voters on November 4, 2014. This law entitles employees in Massachusetts to earn and use sick time according to certain conditions, and will go into effect July 1, 2015. Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey has announced a transition policy under which employers who offer sufficient sick leave or paid time off to workers now have a six-month transition period in which to bring their policies into compliance with the new Massachusetts paid sick leave law.

 

To learn more about the transition policy, please see our full Employment Law Alert.

Massachusetts Attorney General Issues Proposed Regulations on Sick Leave Law  

April 30, 2015 Leave a comment

By: Robert M. Shea

As we previously advised clients, on November 4 Massachusetts voters approved a ballot measure entitling employees to earned sick leave.  The new Massachusetts sick leave law goes into effect on July 1, 2015.

The Massachusetts Attorney General has now issued proposed regulations on the application and enforcement of the new law. The proposed regulations can be found here.  The Attorney General’s Office invites comments on the proposed regulations and will be holding a series of public hearings in six difference locations in the Commonwealth.  The first hearing is scheduled in Boston on May 18, 2015.  Information concerning providing comments and the public hearings can be found here.

Please feel free to contact any member of our Employment Law Group with questions about the Sick Leave Law or the proposed regulations.

Tip of the Month: Implement a Payroll Deductions Policy to Take Advantage of the FLSA “Safe Harbor”

April 13, 2015 Leave a comment

Last month’s Tip of the Month reminded employers that communicating and maintaining an overtime policy can minimize liability for unauthorized overtime hours. This month, we focus on a second way employers can protect against wage and hour liability: the inclusion of a payroll deductions policy to take advantage of the “safe harbor” protection against liability for misclassification of employees based on the failure to pay employees on a salary basis.

As you recall, to be exempt from overtime, an employee must be performing duties recognized as exempt under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and must be paid on a “salary basis.” To be paid on a “salary basis” the employee must receive a predetermined amount of compensation each pay period (at least $455/week) which cannot be reduced due to variations in the quality or quantity of the employee’s work. An exempt employee must receive the full salary for any week in which the employee performs any work, subject only to certain limited deductions.

Employers jeopardize employees’ exempt status by making improper deductions from salaries. A payroll deductions policy which meets certain requirements provides employers with the opportunity to reduce overtime liability which might otherwise accrue under the FLSA if improper deductions are made and employees are therefore found to be inappropriately treated as exempt.

A payroll deduction policy only provides a safe harbor if the employer: (1) has a “clearly communicated” policy prohibiting improper deductions, including a complaint mechanism; (2) reimburses employees for any improper deductions; and (3) makes a good faith commitment to comply in the future. The safe harbor is not effective where the employer willfully violates the policy by continuing to make improper deductions after receiving employee complaints.

A good payroll deduction policy should include an explanation of how exempt employees will be paid on a salary basis, with only limited deductions for certain reasons permitted by law, including for social security, taxes, participation in company-sponsored benefit and retirement plans, absence from work for one or more full days taken in compliance with the company’s sickness or disability policy, absence from work which is covered by the Family and Medical Leave Act, absence due to certain types of suspensions, and full or partial days not worked during the initial or terminal week of employment.

For more information on implementing or reviewing a payroll deductions policy, contact a member of the Employment Group.

Immigration Alert: Frequently Asked Questions on the H-1B Cap

April 2, 2015 Leave a comment

The 2016 H-1B Cap season is opened as of April 1st.  The U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Service (“CIS”) issued a press release that it anticipates the H-1B Cap will be reached after the first five business days of April. MBBP has assembled a list of FAQs to help employers, and their employees, understand the implications if the H-1B Cap is reached quickly.

To learn about the frequently asked questions regarding the H-1B Cap, please read our full alert from MBBP’s Immigration Department. Please contact a member of the Immigration team, or your MBBP attorney, with any questions.

 

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Shouldn’t Employers Be Permitted to Prohibit Defamatory or Inappropriate Comments by Employees? New NLRB Report Says No.

March 31, 2015 Leave a comment

2015-01-05_8-57-41It may come as a surprise to many private employers, who often don’t realize that the requirements of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) apply to non-unionized workplaces.  However, in a recently released report the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) addresses the decisions invalidating a variety of handbooks rules found in many employer handbooks.

For more information on how this applies to you read the full alert.

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